January202014
January172014
lnsee:

Carlo & Gianluca

lnsee:

Carlo & Gianluca

December52013
November262013
installator:

"El Museo del Prado ofrecee desde hoy al público el privilegio de poder contemplar ‘Las hijas de Edward Darley Boit’, obra maestra de John Singer Sargent, junto a ‘Las Meninas’ de Velázquez, su fuente directa de inspiración." [2010] (abc.es)

installator:

"El Museo del Prado ofrecee desde hoy al público el privilegio de poder contemplar ‘Las hijas de Edward Darley Boit’, obra maestra de John Singer Sargent, junto a ‘Las Meninas’ de Velázquez, su fuente directa de inspiración." [2010] (abc.es)

(via adistinctivetaste)

8PM

linenforsummertweedforwinter:

gezzaseyes:

A Visit To Tailor Caid

On my last day in Japan, I managed to pay a visit to Tailor Caid in Shibuya, Tokyo. Any fan of menswear owes it to themself to pay this place a visit. Mr Yuhei Yamamoto’s passion for the Ivy style of dress has resulted in this little piece of sartorial splendour. Walk in and it’s like travelling 60 years back in time – Doris Day on the record player, original 1950s and 1960s issues of GQ, Esquire and other menswear magazines and the clothes …

Oh, the clothes! The suits, sportscoats, shirts and trousers are truly something to behold. I spent a very pleasant hour in here talking to Yamamoto-san while he brought out pictures, film stills and magazine articles of Ivy icons one after another – Sinatra, Cary Grant, Anthony Hopkins„ Steve McQueen, excitedly pointed out the various details on the clothing and then brought out virtually identical Tailor Caid-made items. Certain small details – lapel width, notch size might have been changed slightly to cater to modern tastes but aside from that they were identical. These details have been painstaking gleaned from magazine articles, movie stills and books depicting the Ivy style. Even the shirt and jacket labels paid homage to the icons of Ivy – Brooks Brothers and Chipp.

I was thrilled to be asked to try on one of their jackets (the grey piece in the photo) and had I had more time in the country, a commission might have been on the cards. It fit very well and the higher armholes were a very nice touch.

Of course, I had to get a souvenir of my visit and it was to be the tie that I’m wearing in the photo – a classic black silk knit tie that’s thick and with a nice crunch. I will be smiling every time I put it on.

When passion and art meet, something wonderful like Tailor Caid is the result and I am blessed to have been able to spend a little time there with Yamamoto-san. This was my first trip to Japan and certainly will not be the last – a return visit to Tailor Caid will definitely be on the cards.

Our Man in Japan.

November172013

prettypeachpeonies:

In awe of this German artist: Conrad Jon Godly

(via quitecontinental)

November152013

brokeandbespoke:

J. Lawrence Khaki’s of Carmel Private Label F/W 2013

Last winter I headed down to J. Lawrence Khaki’s of Carmel for the first time. I’d seen it consistently listed in Esquire Magazine’s list of top menswear retailers in the country, but I rarely make the three-hour drive down to Carmel-by-the-Sea as the town’s coastal charms bear little relevance to my day-to-day life.

As luck would have it, Gus (abitofcolor.tumblr.com) was a frequent visitor to both Khaki’s and Carmel and invited me along on a trip to shoot some pictures for our blogs, and I jumped at the chance. I snapped so many pictures during that first trip that I still draw on them when I’m strapped for some new pictorial content for the blog almost a year later.

Long time readers of this blog may remember my reaction to the store, its owner Jim Ockert, and the bounty of menswear goodness I saw there. But if not, you can read about it here. Needless to say, I was pretty impressed. The variety of merchandise carried in the store was stunning, and the one hundred or so mannequins personally styled by Jim Ockert were a true sight to behold. I think the amount of clothing on the mannequins alone were enough to make up the stock of a small menswear boutique.

Since Khaki’s is located in a famed tourist destination, the shop stocks everything from resort-style sportswear to the rarest menswear labels from around the world. But don’t be mistaken, the store’s stock isn’t determined only by the clientele that frequents it. Jim Ockert is a master curator (I’m no fan of this term when it comes to merchandising menswear, but think it truly does apply here), and his vision for the store produces a vast array of items that speaks to any one who walks into the store, and it helps them find clothes and brands that they wouldn’t otherwise have known they’d want in their wardrobe. This year I saw amazing outerwear from Inis Meain, Gimo’s, Grayers, Allegri, and others, and great pants from Hiltl, Masons, Incotex, and more. It was astounding.

Jim Ockert loves color, and every season colors are on full display. This isn’t the type of store where the season dictates the color palette. Fall and winter garments are available in both the more muted hues commonly associated with colder weather, but also in bright heavy cashmeres and amazingly bold tweeds. But this is stuff that has become well known about Jim Ockert and J. Lawrence Khaki’s Carmel. What really blew me away this time was the expansion of the Khaki’s Private Label clothing.

Last winter I was impressed by the iconoclastic tweeds Jim had chosen for the Private Label sport coats, and by the careful detailing that went into the cotton khakis and wool trousers under the house label. But it all looked like a cautious start to something that might be great. This time, I was floored by how far the Private Label line had come in just a year, and indeed by how great it had already become.

Though Khaki’s stocks the latest and greatest by both well-known and rare labels, it was the J. Lawrence Khaki’s Private Label clothes that really wowed me on this trip. The new Khaki’s Private Label jackets come in three cuts, and are made by two of the remaining great tailoring establishments in the U.S., Martin Greenfield in Brooklyn, NY, and Adrian Jules of Rochester, NY.

There’s a ‘British’ cut that has a structured shoulder with slight roping, a ticket pocket (unflapped for a nice touch), and double vents. I tried one on in a very heavy 16 oz. bottle green cashmere (a weight that almost makes it like outerwear) that was incredibly luxurious and surprisingly agile considering its weight.

There’s a more Neapolitan-inspired cut that features no shoulder padding and three patch pockets, which I tried on in a beautiful black (I know!) cashmere. And there’s a ‘neo-American’ cut that features a more natural shoulder, a slightly roomier cut (akin to Canali’s off-the-rack offerings) and a jetted ticket pocket for some flair, which I tried on in a wildly decadent navy vicuna.

Khaki’s Private Label pant line has expanded too, and I tried on a couple of pairs in their new trimmer fit in a heavy wool Donegal fabric, and also in a beautiful brushed cotton that manages to be both rugged and refined. It’s similar to moleskin in its warmth and slightly matte look, but more elegant in its finish such that it can be work appropriate in all but the most formal of settings, and will likely hold up better over time.

I couldn’t quite put my finger on what it was about these sport coats and pants that stood out, so I asked Jim Ockert what drives him in the decision making process about his private label. He responded simply by saying, “I want to give customers clothes they won’t find anywhere else.”

While I believe what Jim said is true, it didn’t help me much in trying to understand what set the collection apart from the stuff I see on my tumblr dashboard every day, or what I see when I go into the city to window shop. When I pushed him on it, Jim told me that he begins with the fabric (not a surprise). He chooses limited run fabrics from some of the finest mills in the world like Loro Piana, and then, assured that the product will stand out, moves on to the details that will give it the Khaki’s touch. I think that’s what best summarizes what’s going on with Khaki’s new Private Label offerings: rare and bold fabrics, unique details born of Jim Ockert’s colorful tastes and long career in men’s retail, and a variety of cuts that will fit almost any size and taste.

If you haven’t already, go check out Khaki’s of Carmel. I’d hurry to go see the Fall/Winter offerings before they’re rotated out, but I’ve no doubt that the precedent being set here is that each season will outshine the previous one…

(via abitofcolor)

November142013

iqfashion:

Akira Sorimachi

Source: United Arrows - F/W 2013/2014

November122013
November22013

deviatesinc:

Just some color photos of Romaine Brooks’ studio, nbd.

(via adistinguishedvillain)

October262013
patrickhumphreys:

Bill Blass and Niki de Gunzburg at the Ritz bar, illustrated by Joe Eula, 1980.

patrickhumphreys:

Bill Blass and Niki de Gunzburg at the Ritz bar, illustrated by Joe Eula, 1980.

October252013
ovadiaandsons:

Friday in the office w/ the multi panel tweed jacket. #ovadiaandsons

ovadiaandsons:

Friday in the office w/ the multi panel tweed jacket. #ovadiaandsons

(via enthusiasmdocumented)

October202013

dg6group:

F/W Inspiration from our favorite accessories brand - Viola Milano. Their recent campaign is illustrated by the very talented Menco Nieuwenhuis of http://www.lacouleurblanche.nl/ Check it out for some more awesome inspiration!

www.violamilano.com

 

(via michaeljondral)

October182013
stateofblog:

The Process posted by: A Distinctive Taste
photos by Rachel Couch
Amancio and Tadashi are my only role models. Ralph and Ingvar are my only role models. If you will allow me to take you back to the beginning of the process; it would have to be 2001 when I got my first job working as a barista at Starbucks. For me, that was my first taste at financial freedom and the ability to save and invest. All for the love of Air Jordans. At the time I had no idea that by maintaining them I would be able to sell them years later. But my infatuation turned into an obsession all the way down to the process of how Nike designed and ultimately constructed them.  
Learning about the treatment and compensation of the employees in the Nke Vietnam factories opened my mind up at a young age to the possibilities of being able to create my own brand under better circumstances. Fast forward to 2008, I am slowly making my transition from streetwear to a modern menswear look. Slimmer cut suits, higher quality ties ect. The problem is by that time, I was a hype beast japan streetwear feign. The Japanese had taught me to appreciate quality and craftsmanship over anything else. I found myself in similar situation although the stakes were much higher. The difference in cost between a pair of shoes and quality pair was $100-$300. The difference between average menswear and quality was $500-$1000. 

Enter thrifting. My eye was there, I knew what I wanted and knew the brands that produced the quality. The biggest problem with my thrifted finds was having to get them altered and at the end of the day, it was mine. My biggest question were; why does it cost so much to have quality and why have so many other vendors in the game decided to go with the status quo of appealing only to a small sector of men who can afford their clothes leaving out so many others to have to either thrift or wear poorly made clothes?  The answer turned out to be three things; Cost to manufacture, brand profit and retail markup. The retail markup being the biggest cost to the customer. You have heard the saying “if you put in one dollar you need to make $4-$5 back”  

What we are doing is different because our retail location has multiple revenue streams from coffee, food and we have editorial partners lined up. This allows us to lower the retail markup. All the brands we work with have very little if any distribution around the world but have painstakingly perfected their craft and artisinal qualities. We work with them to keep their prices low while selling in the shop and online at the same price they have established. We take a cut for displaying it in the shop and keep it moving. Because we never have more than one or two items of each, it has allowed us to keep our retail cost extremely low which is something that I absolutely pride myself on for not passing that on to my customer. I am also happy to take on this venture because very few in the industry have been able to successfully embrace this model. 

The point I am trying to make in all of this is that we have found a way to make custom accessible to the average man without jeopardizing the integrity or quality in our craftsmanship.Over the past month we have been introducing our MTM line to receive constructive feedback from our potential customers. But the theory and whiskey will soon be brought to an end and we will let the streets talk with their wallets.  I hope they will enjoy the brands and experience we bring to them as much as we have enjoyed creating it.
ADT

stateofblog:

The Process posted by: A Distinctive Taste

photos by Rachel Couch

Amancio and Tadashi are my only role models. Ralph and Ingvar are my only role models. If you will allow me to take you back to the beginning of the process; it would have to be 2001 when I got my first job working as a barista at Starbucks. For me, that was my first taste at financial freedom and the ability to save and invest. All for the love of Air Jordans. At the time I had no idea that by maintaining them I would be able to sell them years later. But my infatuation turned into an obsession all the way down to the process of how Nike designed and ultimately constructed them.  


Learning about the treatment and compensation of the employees in the Nke Vietnam factories opened my mind up at a young age to the possibilities of being able to create my own brand under better circumstances. Fast forward to 2008, I am slowly making my transition from streetwear to a modern menswear look. Slimmer cut suits, higher quality ties ect. The problem is by that time, I was a hype beast japan streetwear feign. The Japanese had taught me to appreciate quality and craftsmanship over anything else. I found myself in similar situation although the stakes were much higher. The difference in cost between a pair of shoes and quality pair was $100-$300. The difference between average menswear and quality was $500-$1000. 

Enter thrifting. My eye was there, I knew what I wanted and knew the brands that produced the quality. The biggest problem with my thrifted finds was having to get them altered and at the end of the day, it was mine. My biggest question were; why does it cost so much to have quality and why have so many other vendors in the game decided to go with the status quo of appealing only to a small sector of men who can afford their clothes leaving out so many others to have to either thrift or wear poorly made clothes?  The answer turned out to be three things; Cost to manufacture, brand profit and retail markup. The retail markup being the biggest cost to the customer. You have heard the saying “if you put in one dollar you need to make $4-$5 back”  

What we are doing is different because our retail location has multiple revenue streams from coffee, food and we have editorial partners lined up. This allows us to lower the retail markup. All the brands we work with have very little if any distribution around the world but have painstakingly perfected their craft and artisinal qualities. We work with them to keep their prices low while selling in the shop and online at the same price they have established. We take a cut for displaying it in the shop and keep it moving. Because we never have more than one or two items of each, it has allowed us to keep our retail cost extremely low which is something that I absolutely pride myself on for not passing that on to my customer. I am also happy to take on this venture because very few in the industry have been able to successfully embrace this model. 

The point I am trying to make in all of this is that we have found a way to make custom accessible to the average man without jeopardizing the integrity or quality in our craftsmanship.Over the past month we have been introducing our MTM line to receive constructive feedback from our potential customers. But the theory and whiskey will soon be brought to an end and we will let the streets talk with their wallets.  I hope they will enjoy the brands and experience we bring to them as much as we have enjoyed creating it.

ADT

2PM

caccioppoli1920:

London Tour

At Maurice Sedwell on Savile Row with Andrew Ramroop (who is wearing a suit made with our fabric).

The Rows finest

(via modernconnoisseurtt)

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